Thursday, October 1, 2009

Word Verification Balderdash


Word Verification Balderdash is a weekly meme hosted by Sheila at One Person's Journey Through A World Of Books.

Here is what you do. You write down all the word verifications you come across as you are posting comments on other peoples blogs. You then play Balderdash with them. Now for those of you who don't know how to play, you take a made up word and come up with a authentic sounding definition for it. Do this for a week and then post your best ones every Thursday.

Here are mine for this week:

Emsalar: Small 5 inch salamanders that are native to the Hawaiian Islands. They are primarily found in old lava tubes that have pools of water in them. They are identified by their red and black marking that look like flames coming off their backs. They secrete a specialized poison from their skin that burns the victim to a crisp.

Cartnest: These are nests that are built in old, abandoned carts that have been left by the roadside for years. These nests are inhabited by the Giant Horsefly which can grow to the size of a small deer and are known to be very dangerous. The best way to eliminate them is by burning their cartnests with a mixture of lighter fluid, apple cider vinegar, and antifreeze.

Alliterc: Alligators native to a 10 Km stretch of Madagascar. They grow no longer than 5' 2" long and are a chartreuse in color. They have large flaps of skin that attaches their front and back legs along their abdomens. They use these flaps to leap from one river bank to another along the same way a flying squirrel will "fly" from one tree to another. This adaptation makes them the top predator and they are able to surprise prey in such a way as to make them almost unbeatable.

Downeigi: Small burrowing animals that from the casual eye looks like a cross between a badger and a kangaroo. They use their powerful back legs to dig into the ground where they make their burrows. They are herbivores that have a very specialized diet. They only eat the roots of Poplar and White Birch trees. They are native to the Pacific Northwest of the United States. There is a week long festival in Coazial, WA that celebrates this adorable mammal that is capped off by parades, cooking demonstrations, and a Downeigi lookalike contest.

Merstroh: Region of Peru named after the American Biologist, Dr. Miriam Merstroh, who first identified it as a specialized ecosystem. It has became famous worldwide for it's unique inhabitants. From a purple orchid that eats iridescent hummingbirds, to a fish that has a beak and blue fur, and a small wild cat that is no bigger than a common field mouse this is a unique and diverse tract of land.

4 comments:

Sheila (bookjourney) said...

Ryan these are fantastic - you have a sort of theme going here... from salamanders, to horse flies, to alligators to badger/kangaroos, and then hummingbird eating plants....

If I was wearing a hat I could say hats off to you my friend....

Cartnest is my favorite this week and your elimination of them including apple cider vinegar cracked me up as our area is finally getting to the end of the crazy fruit fly season which we capture using, yes, apple cider vinegar. (However I would probably need to buy it in bulk if I were to try to kill a horse fly the size of a deer.)

Alexia561 said...

Great definitions! You just keep getting better and better at this game!

Loved the whole National Geographic feel to this week's words. Great job! :)

La Coccinelle said...

I'm not sure if I'd want to encounter any of those creatures! Especially the ones that live in cartnests...

Creations by Laurel-Rain Snow said...

Ooh! You could actually create a "monster" story, using these creepy things as characters.